Graphic Design Discussion

        Incorporating graphic design into my 7th grade ELA and Social Studies classroom can be very valuable. According to the article by Jonna Mae Magno, “Middle school students are of the age where it is hard to keep their attention. But with visual tools, complex data and difficult lessons can now be compressed in an engaging way”. I completely agree that it is very difficult to keep a seventh graders attention. This past year, I began incorporating more graphic designs into my lessons with great success. In Social Studies, my students had to create an infographic for the Bill of Rights. They were engaged, connected, and motivated throughout the entire assignment. They enjoyed using Canva to create their infographic and overall their tests scores on the Bill of Rights were very high. Then later in the year, I had my class partner up with another Social Studies class for an inventors research assignment. They had to create an infographic for their inventor. My students did a fantastic job teaching their partners how to use Canva, and their presentations were very engaging. Jonna Mae Magno also mentioned in her article, “Middle schoolers’ minds are creative, impulsive, moody and easily bummed out. They want to be engaged, connected, motivated and independent”. By using graphic design in the classroom, I was able to engage their minds by connecting to their creative desire to share information in a different way than just a written essay. 

        Students absorb information is a multitude of ways. Students can gain information from what they see, hear, do to name a few. By incorporating graphic designs into my lessons, I can engage and support more types of learners in my lessons. A lesson that would benefit from incorporating some of the design principles is our World’s Fair project. At the end of the past school year, my colleagues and I decided to try a new project for social studies. We had our students watch part of a documentary on the Chicago World’s Fair and then they  had to create their own world’s fair. One part of the project was a map of their fair. Some of their maps were great but a lot of them were lacking in many areas. To make their maps better for next year, we will need to incorporate some of the design principles on font, color, layout, shape, alignment, and proximity into a mini-lesson that is taught before they begin their maps. This would reduce the amount of time I spent with each individual group as they struggled to create a visually appealing map. 

 

Works Cited

Magno, Jonna Mae. “8 Examples of How to Incorporate Infographics in the Classroom.”

        Venngage, 17 Apr. 2015, venngage.com/blog/8-examples-on-using-infographics-

       in-middle-school-classrooms/. Accessed 4 July 2019.

3 thoughts on “Graphic Design Discussion

  1. Hi Keri,

    I love your idea of creating an inforgraphic! I really enjoyed doing this in another course I’m taking right now. As a science teacher, I’m always looking for opportunities for students to be creative, and I really like your idea.

    Mallory Hashiguchi

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  2. Hi Keri,
    It sounds like you are already off to a great start on incorporating graphic design into your lessons. It’s awesome to hear the correlation between the students creating their own Bill of Rights infographic with their performance on that particular assessment. I agree that incorporating technology is a more creative avenue for showing what you know, as opposed to a written essay. Thanks for sharing your ideas. I am motivated to try some of this in my class!

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  3. Hi Keri,

    I love your infographic idea on the Bill of Rights. I would assume that topic isn’t something that would traditionally engage all students as it isn’t the most exciting (from what I remember!), but the infographic aspect seems to have really engaged them!

    Like

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